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The Next Adventure Begins…

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suse_logo_colorAs I’ve updated my audiences on SoMe this week, I’ve taken on an executive role at SUSE, where I will lead the efforts for SUSE’s solutions strategy when it comes to cloud, storage, big data, and more.

The company has been doing a great job in these areas, and I’ve been fortunate to partner with them in various roles across OpenStack, Ceph, and more.

My goal is to start with the good work already deployed in market, and help take it to the next level to enable customers to address serious business challenges with these solutions, simply and effectively.

More to come as I get my feet set in the new role, but I am very excited to join SUSE, a company that understands the emerging technology space, it’s customers, and it’s communities – and is poised to do big things with it’s contributions to open source and it’s commercial offerings.

Let the adventure begin!

Until next time,

JBG
@jbgeorge

 

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Categories: Uncategorized

Michael Dell Comments on the “Data Economy”

March 24, 2014 Leave a comment

This is a repost of my blog at  .

In this short interview with Inc., Michael Dell provides an overview of the company’s transformation into a leading player in the “data economy.”   

As Michael notes, with the costs of collecting data decreasing, more companies in a growing number of industries are making better use of existing data sources, and gathering data from new sources. 

And that’s where Dell has been enabling customers for years with solutions built with technologies like Hadoop and NoSql.  Helping companies and organizations make better use of this data, and assisting them in using it to solve their challenges, are just a few of the ways Dell has changed the Big Data conversation, and built an entirely new enterprise business along the way.

As a member of the Technology CEO Council, Michael also recently joined other tech CEOs to discuss the data economy with policy makers.  As an example of the potential of the data economy, he explained how Dell’s growing health information technology practice includes 7 billion medical images. These images are in an aggregated data set allowing researchers to mine them for patterns and predictive analytics.

“There’s lots that can be done with this data that was very, very siloed in the past,” Michael toldComputerworld, “We’re really just kind of scratching the surface.”

It’s certainly an exciting time to be at Dell – and the data revolution continues!

Read more…

THIS JUST IN: VMware and Dell Partner to Enable Cloud Foundry via #Crowbar

August 17, 2011 4 comments

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And the goodness just keeps on coming!

DellA few weeks ago, Dell (they company I work for) unleashed the power of the Dell developed, open source Crowbar software framework as a part of the announcement of the Dell OpenStack Cloud Solution.  It allowed users to deploy a full OpenStack IaaS cloud on bare metal PowerEdge C servers in less than two hours (vs multiple days if done manually), and allows for a continuous integration mechanism for the stood up cloud. 

A week later, we announced the Dell | Cloudera Solution for Apache Hadoop, which also leverages the powerful Crowbar software to deploy a running Hadoop cluster on to bare metal PowerEdge C servers in less than a day, where it can take days or even weeks if deployed by other means.

So….

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)?   Check.

Hadoop / Big Data?  Check.

But what about Platform as a Service (PaaS)?

Big time check.
  

VMware Cloud FoundryToday, VMware is announcing their development of a Cloud Foundry barclamp for Dell’s Crowbar software!

VMware’s Cloud Foundry is an open platform as a service (PaaS) project initiated by VMware designed to support multiple frameworks, multiple cloud providers, and multiple application services all on a cloud scale platform. It’s a project that is only a few months old, but one that has been getting outstanding interest from enterprises who want PaaS to be the new developer UI to their private cloud.  And Cloud Foundry is already powering real solutions.
  

And now it can be deployed quickly, simply, and automated with Dell’s Crowbar software.  
  

Crowbar, software that leverages OpsCode’s Chef configuration management tool,  allows users to get up and running on powerful technologies like Cloud Foundry, but actually does much more.  It actually does BIOS configuration, RAID configuration, network discovery, deploys Nagios and Ganglia, and more to enable an environment ideal for complex technologies.  It is also aware of changes in its environment, and adjusts to them in an automated manner.  (Learn more about Crowbar here.)
  

This is another win for open source in my book, and a real indicator of the impact open source is going to have on the next era of IT.

Dell's Crowbar SoftwareSo who’s the next Crowbar barclamp rockstar? 

You tell me.

You.  Crowbar.  Download.  Build barclamp.  Share.

I’d love to be telling your story here next.  🙂

More info:

  
Until next time,

JBGeorge
@jbgeorge

Citrix Synergy 2011: Day 1

May 26, 2011 Leave a comment
Welcome to Citrix Synergy 2011!
Welcome to Citrix Synergy 2011!

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Hello from San Fran!

Boy, what a day at Day 1 of the Citrix Synergy event.  I’m kicking back at the Serrano Hotel after a long day of meeting, greeting, networking, and learning at they event.  Made a lot of new friends today, and got to touch base with a lot of old acquaintences. 

I had a lot of high hopes for the conference this week.  And the keynote got it off to a rocking start.

I was particularly interested in the OpenStack announcement, but there was a ton of great announcements and demos today.  Also had some great meetings with the press today since Dell was a part of the announcements. 

Here are some of the highlights I found interesting…

  • First off, the OpenStack news – Citrix announced “Project Olympus” which would include a Citrix distribution of OpenStack and a cloud-optimized version of XenServer.   There’s an early access program that customers can engage in to work with Citrix, Dell, and Rackspace to get things kicked off there.  Check out more at my blog on it here.
      
  • Google did a pretty cool thing by doing a demo with the Citrix crew on stage, and then proceeded to give away about 100 Chromebooks to keynote attendees.  Unfortunately, I was not one of them. 
      
  • Citrix CEO Mark Templeton did a great job of pitching a nice connected story of BYO-ThreePC – Personal Cloud, Private Cloud, and Public Cloud.
      
  • Citrix showcased a couple of new new NetScaler products – Cloud Gateway to helps in orchestrating web and windows apps, and Cloud Bridge to connect cloud data, directory, web, and apps between public and private clouds.
     
  • Great demos on the new and improved Citrix Receiver.  Lots of nice UI updates, drag and drop, etc.  And features are translated into the administration side of things as well.  It was also cool to see Android apps running in Windows via Citrix Receiver.  Things are becoming seamless….
      

Some great quotes:

Live from Citrix Synergy 2011...

Live from Citrix Synergy 2011...

  • Citrix’s mantra = “Whatever, whenever, wherever” – I like it.  (Also heard a lot of “any, any, any”.)
  • “Don’t encrypt the laptop – encrypts the data.”
  • Consumerization is a major force and will force changes in IT
      

 OK, well that’s all I’ve got in me for tonight – there was a ton more – feel free to comment about items you found interesting. 

I’ll be back tomorrow with another update.

Until next time,

JOSEPH
@jbgeorge

One Giant Leap for Cloud: Citrix, Dell, and Rackspace Step Up with OpenStack

May 25, 2011 Leave a comment

OpenStackLast July, when the world learned about OpenStack for the first time, it was clear that it needed a group of partners to share the vision for OpenStack’s potential – open, standards based, and a platform for cloud innovation.

And there were partners those who stepped up.

Dell (my employer), Citrix, and others joined Rackspace and NASA, and committed to what they foresaw as a force in cloud.  This was a critical juncture in OpenStack’s evolution – industry heavyweights had to be visionary at this stage, while OpenStack was still developing as a technology and as an initiative.

(I’m proud to say that Dell was the only hardware solutions vendor who committed to the OpenStack initiative right from the beginning.)

Fast forward to almost a year later, and OpenStack’s pioneer partners are once again stepping up to help drive OpenStack as a technology platform and further the OpenStack community.

CitrixToday, Citrix is announcing Project Olympus, a new cloud infrastructure product based on OpenStack, which will include a certified version of OpenStack as well as a cloud optimized version of XenServer.

And to help drive this, Citrix is announcing the launch of an Early Access Program, with support from Dell and Rackspace and a host of other partners in the OpenStack community, allowing customers to get – you guessed it – early access to Olympus.

(Read the entire announcement here – http://www.citrix.com/English/NE/news/news.asp?newsID=2311980)

At Dell, “Open, Capable, Affordable” is our mantra, and we view certified distributions of open source code as an important part of adoption. It provides customers with peace of mind knowing that a company like Citrix is behind them as they themselves step up to OpenStack. And Citrix is a company we all know and respect, and one that many of us regularly depend on as a software provider – Xen, XenServer, XenDesktop, NetScaler, and on and on.

With this announcement, it’s important that we not gloss over what we’re seeing happening here in the OpenStack community.

It’s not that these key vendors are just supporting the OpenStack movement…

RackspaceThey’re participating in it.

And, yes – it’s a big deal.

This isn’t an announcement of some new consortium based on OpenStack – this is an announcement about key technology leaders doing what they do best to advance an initiative we believe in.  All of the companies mentioned have teams dedicated to developing OpenStack, contributing in technical conversations, learning about how customers can benefit from it, and driving the business of the open source cloud platform.

  • Citrix is focusing its strengths and core competencies to help enable customers in the software stack via this new distribution and cloud optimized XenServer.
       
  • Rackspace has launched an entire business unit to OpenStack installation, training, and support by way of Rackspace Cloud Builders.
       
  • Dell’s OpenStack team (of which I’m a part) has been leading the way in bare metal deployment of multi-node OpenStack clouds with Crowbar, and an operational model to base full OpenStack solutions on. (You may have seen our live demos at Cloud Connect, SXSW, and the OpenStack Design Summit.)
        

And that’s the difference. No one is watching from the bench – these guys have been in since the beginning and are living it daily. 

DellWe, as the Openstack community, believe we need an open alternative, believe in OpenStack, and believe it is going to change how we develop, build, and run the cloud. And each of us brings our core competencies to the table to help mature the technology, enabling this community to grow and thrive.

And this is a great time for YOU to get involved in OpenStack as well.  Check it out at www.openstack.org and get involved.

If you’re learning more about Project Olympus, check out the Olympus webpage at http://www.citrix.com/olympus.

If you’re interested in learning more about Dell and OpenStack visit www.Dell.com/OpenStack or email us at OpenStack@Dell.com.

Kudos to Citrix on Project Olympus, as well as to all of us in the OpenStack community, as we continue to drive this initiative forward.

I’m actually here in San Francisco at the Citrix Synergy conference this week, and I hope to be blogging on the happenings going on. If you’re here as well, I’d be interesting in hearing your thoughts on OpenStack, the announcement, and how you can participate as well.  Contact me via Twitter and let’s chat.  I’m @jbgeorge – try not to be distracted by the incredibly handsome profile picture.   🙂

Until next time,

JOSEPH
@jbgeorge

Learn more:

The “Open” Trend in Cloud…

"Yes We're Open!"

C’mon – all the cool kids are doing it…

Going “open” that is.

How many announcements have we seen in the last few months having something to do with open technology when it comes to the cloud space?  With a great mix of business benefits AND customer / end user benefits, going open is certainly the latest trend.

I think this is a great and overdue market direction – standards are needed in this space, and I’m hopeful that this level of vendor response will help get us there.  Additionally, its important that we understand that open technology, while enabling users, should also benefit vendors, so that they can continue to invest in and support open products. 

Here’s a sampling of all the fantastic-ness.

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OpenStack

OpenStack

This one is near and dear to my heart since I’m the OpenStack business lead at Dell.  But my view is that OpenStack really kicked off this season’s “open” trend.  Announced last July, it’s an open source cloud platform that has gained serious momentum with over 60 vendors in the community and quite a few developers world wide.  With the latest release of their code base (codenamed Cactus), and their recent Design Summit (at the Hyatt Regency in Santa Clara – where else?), service providers and large enterprises are taking a serious look at OpenStack as a viable cloud solution.  (Learn more at www.OpenStack.org.  Also shameless plug for www.Dell.com/OpenStack.)

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OpenCompute

Facebook helped launch this initiative as they strove to build a low cost, yet highly efficient computing infrastructure.  Partnering with other industry stalwarts like Dell and Rackspace, Facebook opened up the specs on the efficient servers that make up their environment, in an effort to encourage other companies to build energy efficient infrastructures.  (Learn more at www.opencompute.org.)

VMware Cloud Foundry (Open PaaS)

With its aquisition of the SpringSource Java development framework, and of RabbitMQ, the cloud messaging technology, VMware makes a bold move into the cloud space by unveling Cloud Foundry as an open source “Platform as a Service”.   Focused on Java application developers , Cloud Foundry supports Ruby on Rails, Sinatra, and Rails, and allows developers a quick and easy way to get development platforms up and available. 

 Another plus – my good buddy Dave McCrory (@mccrory) is helping drive this initiative at VMware.  🙂  

(Learn more at www.cloudfoundry.com)

openshift.redhat.com/app

OpenShift

Speaking of open PaaS, Red Hat announced its OpenShift Platform as a Service today.  Their focus is to produce exportable workloads that can be used via private cloud or public cloud, such as Amazon.  OpenShift will support Java, PHP, Python, and Ruby.  Ironically, the open source is not yet open source, but will be shortly.

(Learn more at openshift.redhat.com/app.)

OpenFlow

How can I continue without mentioning OpenFlow?  As many experts agree, the network will be one of the most critical components to cloud success.   Created to help drive innovation in networking, a number of vendors are investigating ways to add OpenFlow as a feature to their networking portfolio.   Dell, Nicira, and others are some interesting names in this space.  I’m hopeful we’ll hear some interesting news about commercial networking providers and OpenFlow as Interop kicks off next week.

(Learn more at www.openflow.org.)

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So what do you think should be next here?  Do you feel open sourcing cloud technologies advance us as an industry? 

Drop me a line or leave a comment – would love to hear your thoughts.

Until next time.

JOSEPH
@jbgeorge